Administration of Estates

WHAT IS A GRANT OF REPRESENTATION?

A ‘grant of representation’ is the legal document which issues from the High Court Probate Office which allows the personal representative(s) to collect all assets of the deceased and administer the estate. Contact us for a no obligation communication

Where the person(s) named as executor under the Will extract a grant of representation such document is known as a Grant of Probate.

Where somebody other than the executors extract the Grant, the legal document is known as a Grant of Administration with Will Annexed. Where there is no Will, it is known as a Grant of Administration Intestate. Until the Grant of Representation issues from the Probate Office, the personal representatives are generally unable to deal with the assets owned by the   deceased person. In limited circumstances, it may be possible to administer an estate without obtaining a grant. Contact us for a no obligation communication

WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE?

  • It is necessary to go through the deceased’s papers (Bank/Building Society books/statements/insurance policies/saving certificates/shares/stocks/title deeds and any other papers which will help to identify the assets and liabilities of the estate).
  • Financial institutions will generally release funds to pay for the funeral on receipt of certain documentation from the personal representatives.
  • The insurance cover on property or other valuable assets should be checked.
  • Practical steps may involve removing valuables, turning off the mains water, installing additional locks/window locks/alarm, informing neighbours, the insurance company and the local Garda Station that the house is unoccupied.
  • Valuations must be obtained setting out the value of all the assets and liabilities of the estate at the date of death.
  • It should be ascertained whether or not the deceased availed of the Fair Deal Scheme under the Nursing Home Support Scheme Act 2009.
  • Tax liabilities must be dealt with. Contact us for a no obligation communication

WHO MAKES DECISIONS?

The personal representative(s) should make decisions in consultation with the beneficiaries. For instance, before making a decision to sell any part of the estate, the personal representatives should discuss the matter with the beneficiaries concerned and should abide by the wishes of beneficiaries insofar as is practical.Contact us for a no obligation communication

HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE?

Although the law allows one year from the date of death for a personal representative to give beneficiaries what is due to them, the time it actually takes to bring matters to finalisation very much depends on the circumstances of each individual case. It will usually be upwards of eight months before a grant of representation issues but it can take considerably longer. Contact us for a no obligation communication

The following matters are relevant: Contact us for a no obligation communication

  1. The size of the estate and the time it takes to get all of the detailed information required to complete an Inland Revenue Affidavit (CA24). The Inland Revenue Affidavit is a Revenue form which lists the value of the assets and liabilities of the deceased as at the date of death. Included in the form are details of beneficiaries who inherit over €20,000 from the deceased and of any gifts or inheritances received by beneficiaries since 5th December 1991. The Inland Revenue Affidavit is submitted directly to the Probate Office and the Revenue are then sent the form by the Probate Office.
  1. The availability of PPS numbers. This is required not only for the deceased but also for the beneficiaries.
  1. Whether the beneficiaries have received previous gifts/inheritances. If so, full details will be required (this is necessary for tax purposes). Contact us for a no obligation communication

WHAT SORT OF LEGAL ISSUES ARE INVOLVED?  Contact us for a no obligation communication

The starting point is usually the reading of the Will and identifying anything requiring legal interpretation or any circumstances which have changed since the Will was written. Sometimes there may be additions to the Will (in legal terms called

“codicils”) and the effect of these should be carefully considered. There are an infinite range of circumstances which may mean that legal advice is needed, such as:

  • Where there is any doubt about the meaning of the Will or its validity.
  • Title matters i.e. ownership of property.
  • Whether the deceased was divorced or separated.
  • From which account debts should be paid and whether there is sufficient cash to pay liabilities and legacies.
  • If a beneficiary is under the age of 18 years or is suffering from a disability.
  • If a farm or business is involved.
  • The availability of various tax reliefs and steps which could be taken after the death to make sure that all possible tax relief can be claimed.
  • Whether any insurance policies/credit union accounts/post office accounts have been nominated as payable to a particular individual.
  • If the deceased owned assets jointly with any other person.
  • Claims/disputes by disappointed beneficiaries including the rights of children to make a claim.
  • The need to provide for the spouse of the deceased under the Succession Act.
  • Lifetime gifts that should be taken into account.
  • When a legacy is payable to a beneficiary who has predeceased the deceased.
  • Legacies of items which were sold by the deceased before death.
  • Trusts or implied trusts.
  • Pension rights.
  • Foreign assets.
  • Whether the deceased was domiciled abroad.
  • Partial intestacy (where there is a Will but it does not cover all the property of the deceased).
  • Tax implications.
  • Whether the deceased received payments under the Nursing Home Support Scheme.
  • The rights of cohabitants and civil partners Contact us for a no obligation communication

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF LEGACIES?

A specific legacy is an item specifically referred to in the Will such as jewellery, a car or a particular property.   A pecuniary legacy is a bequest of cash. A residuary legacy is what is left over after all debts, funeral, and administration expenses and other legacies have been paid. Contact us for a no obligation communication 

DO I NEED TO CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL PROTECTION?

A bereavement or funeral grant may be available where the deceased made PRSI contributions. If the deceased was on a non-contributory pension or received noncontributory benefits it is necessary to send the Inland Revenue Affidavit to the Department to find out whether the Department intends to claim back money which was paid to the deceased to which he was not entitled (the personal representative may otherwise be held personally liable). A refund may be due to the Department of Social Protection. Contact us for a no obligation communication

DO TAXES COME OUT OF THE RESIDUE?

Not always. Except where there are not enough assets in the estate to pay all taxes, liabilities and cash legacies, in general, taxes due by the deceased come out of the residue.

Beneficiaries must pay their own inheritance tax. In the event that there are beneficiaries who are not resident in Ireland, Irish resident personal representatives are responsible for the payment and filing requirements of the non-resident beneficiaries and should retain enough funds from the benefit of the non-resident beneficiary to pay the inheritance tax due. In such a case where there is no Irish resident personal representative, the personal representatives must appoint a solicitor in Ireland before extracting the grant of representation. Contact us for a no obligation communication

WHAT TAXES ARE INVOLVED?

Apart from any taxes due by the deceased before his death, the Personal Representative will need to address the following taxes:

  • Income tax and capital gains tax which may have arisen during the administration of the estate (the personal representative is otherwise personally liable).
  • Capital Acquisitions Tax (CAT) is a tax on gifts and inheritances.
  • Inheritance tax is payable at the relevant rate (which can be viewed here) on inheritances which exceed certain exemption limits. The limits are known as tax free thresholds which are determined by the relationship of the beneficiary to the deceased. The tax free thresholds change annually and can be viewed here. This tax is the responsibility of each beneficiary unless the beneficiary is non Irish resident in which case the personal representative or the appointed solicitor is responsible as the case may be. It is expected that there will be special tax provision for civil partners once the relevant taxation legislation comes into force.
  • Previous gifts/inheritances received by a beneficiary either from the deceased or any other source since 5 December 1991 are aggregated.
  • Probate tax (If the death occurred before 6 Dec. 2000). Contact us for a no obligation communication
  • Reliefs and or exemptions may be available.

HOW IS THE ESTATE DISTRIBUTED IF THERE IS NO WILL?

Where there is no Will, the Succession Act provides: Contact us for a no obligation communication

  • Where there is a spouse or civil partner and no issue (‘issue’ means children, grandchildren, greatgrandchildren, etc.), the spouse or civil partner takes the whole estate.
  • If there is a spouse or civil partner and issue, the spouse or civil partner takes two thirds and the other third goes to the issue. If a child of the deceased dies before the deceased but leaves children, then those grandchildren take their late parent’s share.
  • If there is no spouse or civil partner, then the issue take the whole estate. If a child of the deceased dies before the deceased but leaves children, then those grandchildren take their late parent’s share.
  • If there is neither spouse nor civil partner nor issue, the estate is distributed between the deceased’s parents in equal shares. If only one parent is alive, that parent takes the whole estate.
  • If there is neither spouse nor civil partner nor issue nor parent(s), the estate is distributed between brothers and sisters in equal shares. If any brother/sister dies before the deceased but leaves children, then those children take their late parents’ share.
  • If the closest living relatives are nephews and nieces, the estate is distributed equally between them.
  • Where there are no nephews/nieces or closer living relatives, then the estate is distributed in equal shares among the next of kin, i.e. the nearest blood relatives in accordance with rules set down in law. Contact us for a no obligation communication

WHAT SORT OF COMPLICATIONS CAN ARISE?

There are many difficulties which can arise in the course of administering an estate which could leave an executor/administrator personally liable. In addition, certain rules of law may override the terms of the Will or impose obligations on an administrator. Finally, recent legislation relating to civil partners and cohabitees will place additional burdens on personal representatives to ensure the proper administration of estates. Contact us for a no obligation communication

SHOULD I CONSULT A LAWYER?

It is essential to identify from the outset any legal and tax issues which may need to be dealt with; these are not always obvious and can result in a personal representative being held personally liable. We will advise you on the steps to be taken and will be in a position to deal with any underlying complexities. We will attend to the considerable administrative detail involved, from assembling accurate date of death information, completing the Revenue and Probate Office forms required in the application for a grant of representation collecting the assets, organising where relevant the filing of tax returns and ultimately making arrangements for the distribution of the estate, and related accounting to the personal representatives and beneficiaries. Contact us for a no obligation communication.

What Our Customers Say

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For expert and practical advice about making an Administration of and Estate, contact Mullins & Treacy 051 391488.  Alternatively, complete our “call back request” and we will contact you at a time that is convenient for you.